I signed myself up to a Virtual Challenge!

I signed myself up for a virtual walking challenge today with Race at your Pace. It’s only a walking challenge, to get myself into the swing of things. Build up my fitness, as my fitness went hugely downhill after a health scare last year. I need something to push me to get back out again, as there isn’t much to do around here other than go to a cafe… especially in the cold… and when you haven’t got a car!

I also am slightly curious to know how this will turn out… I’ve never done a virtual challenge before, and I only heard about it on a Facebook ad. I don’t tend to pay any attention to Facebook ads, they’re usually just full of *cough*crap*cough*. But I was curious to know what this Race at your Pace was.

I did a bit of research into other companies first, as there are a few. Some appear to raise money for charity, others are specifically for running challenges that you have to do in one lump (which I cannot do just yet), others hand out pretty cool medals, from unicorns to marvel medals! In the end I decided to stick with Race at your Pace.

Race at your Pace is a virtual challenge where you sign up to a challenge, select your target and you basically go out and walk/run/cycle/swim over that month to hit your selected target. You can split that running time up over the month. For example, if you signed up to a 50 mile running challenge, you can run one day, take a break, run the next day, and as long as you run 50 miles in that month, you met your target.

You submit your evidence by either taking a photo of your fitbit, your app on your phone, or the screen on your electric bike. Once you have completed your challenge, you get your medal (and a compression top if you go for that option too!)

It’s £10 for just the one challenge, £14 if you want the compression top as well.

And if you manage to complete your challenge, you get a medal posted to you!

This is what the February medals look like:

february-running-medals

(photo taken from the Race at your Pace website)

I figured, my walk to University is a mile each way. That’s at least 2 miles in a day already. If I add that up to the month, that’s between 40-50 miles already.

Doesn’t sounds like a huge accomplishment, but I don’t go to university every day! This month along, I only have two modules, which run from the 21st until the end of the month. That’s only 20 miles.

So, if I sign myself up to a challenge, say I do a 50 mile challenge, that MAKES me walk at least 2 miles each day (not including weekends). Once I get myself into the habit of walking each day, I can up my limit. Say if I do a 50 mile challenge next month, in March I can up to it the 75 mile challenge, April up to the 100 mile, and I could even move onto the running challenges, swimming and cycling (although I’ll need to get myself a bike first!)

I’ll also get a cool collection of medals to show my achievements!

I’ll keep you guys updated on how I do. As January is nearly over, I only signed myself up to the 25 mile walking challenge this month, and I’ve only managed to record about 8 miles on my fitbit so far (its new, haven’t that long ago got it).

But I hope this challenge will encourage me to walk more!

Potential Career pathway – Data Scientist

 

Recently I’ve been really considering what to do after I have completed my Psychology Undergraduate Degree at the Open University, and when I first got into the degree, my initial idea was to just explore the subject because of my interest in Psychology and Criminology.

I went through stages throughout my undergraduate degree learning, thinking about becoming a Forensic Psychologist was one, and although I had since talked myself out of it – because, let’s face it, I’m not really a people person! I have since come to the conclusiong that I really love a) working behind the scenes and b) statistics!

I have a few options, some more to do with psychology than others:

1) A neuropsychologist,
2) A Forensic Scientist,
3) A statistician,
4) A Research (in another field other than neuropsychology),
5) Investigator/Intelligence (E.g. National Crime Agency) or
6) Data Analyst or Data Scientist.

I came across a Data Scientist only recently – I can’t even remember how I came across it, only that it was recent – and as such I’ve become increasingly interested.

I wrote about it on my Facebook account and I even started a small discussion with a friend in America about it and after a small conversation about my past experiences (the fact I did a National Diploma in Computer programming (and got good marks too!) and have on a number of occasions proved that I can problem solve independently – one example is that I recently create an Open Sesame experiment as part of my last psychology degree project and I was telling my tutor how to work it!) and not to mention that my interest for problem solving, statistics and maths in general, he actually agreed that Data Science was a good career path for me!

So, with that in mind, I have since gone onto EdX, a Free Online Courses website which has top universities on there – such as Harvard and Berkley- and I have found there are a few courses on Data Science and Data Analysis, one such course is actually a Microsoft Professional Program.

I’m currently auditing the Introduction to Data Science course and I have to admit, my interest for the subject is only increasing!

Here is the link to the course if you are reading this and interested yourself: https://courses.edx.org/courses/course-v1:Microsoft+DAT101x+1T2018/course/

So far I have got as far as the speakers importing a small data file into Excel and running a few simple Excel functions to clean and analyse the data, most of which I already know from doing a previous course on EdX, but I am going to continue watching the videos and going through this short introduction course to see what else being a Data Scientist involves.

The good thing about this career path, is not only is a well paid job and a challenge (I do like a challenge! I got bored as a simple Administrator!) but that it is in High Demand, especially since the emergence of Big Data but also that it’s universal to different companies and organisations. Which means, I could use these skills to combine two or more of my above career options; for example, I could be a Data Scientist for a governmental organisation and work within an investigations/intelligence environment!